the Style Imaginarium

Aug 19
Viviane Sassen
Aug 19

Viviane Sassen

Sanna Helena Berger
Aug 19

Sanna Helena Berger

"Society has changed a lot since de Beauvoir wrote The Second Sex, but there are still conventions all around us that enforce a female’s belief in her immanence, her permanent and unchanging identity as an object. Think, for example, of the many mainstream women’s magazines that ask women what their “true” color is, or to find out what kind of hairstyle or perfume fits who she really “is”—these are all subtle methods of telling a woman that she has a constant, “true,” unchanging self to uncover. This is quite different from the typical men’s magazine, where the common articles are about objects (cars, electronics, hot women) for the man to act with/upon. Women are told to be, not encouraged to do or make."

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- Anna McConnell 

[this article is so good I can’t believe I’m only just finding it]

(via aranrhod)

Aug 19

"She was ready to deny the existence of space and time rather than admit that love might not be eternal."

- Simone de Beauvoir, The Mandarins (via observando)

Aug 19
Aug 18

c86:

Photography by Roger Minick

Woman with Scarf at Inspiration Point, Yosemite National Park, CA, 1980
Couple Taking Polaroids, Crater Lake National Park, OR, 1980
Couple with Matching Shirts, Crater Lake National Park, OR, 1980

"I want us to make each other better."

- someone you should probably hold on to (via braided-funk)

(via fnaste)

Aug 18
inneroptics:

VINTAGE Tattoo
Aug 18

inneroptics:

VINTAGE Tattoo

(via crystalfountain)

"Color amounts to crime. Derived from the Latin celare, to conceal, color is another word for deceit, says my Webster’s. Benjamin agreed. Sharply distinguishing the child’s view of color from the adult’s, he suggested that adults understood color as a layer superimposed on matter to such a degree that they regard color “as a deceptive cloak.” How strange, therefore, that my dictionary goes on to say that color also signifies authenticity or at least character and nature, as in the phrase, “he showed us his true colors.” Could this amount to what Benjamin thought of as the child’s view of color? Yet the dichotomy of child versus adult, deceit versus authenticity, unwinds itself and leaves us in a no-space that is, perhaps, the truer home of color, for does not the very phrase, “he showed us his true colors,” venerable with age and usage, also suggest the opposite, that color is both true and untrue precisely because of its claims to authenticity? How can you ever be sure with which variety you are dealing, his true colors or his false ones? Is this why we in the West are drawn to color yet made uneasy, even repelled, as by Mafia types in Hawaiian shirts? Who of you reading this text would even dream of painting the living room wall bright red or green, any color other than off-white? Then, safe in your whiteness, you can hang a wildly colored picture on the wall, secure in its framed being."

- Michael Taussig’s “What Color Is Sacred?” in Critical Inquiry (via reichsstadt)

(via arabellesicardi)

Aug 18

"I choose to stay present, to unlearn how to unlove, to love, and to practice my worthiness of it."

- from Buddy Wakefield’s Amplified Stillness (Start Again)

(Source: zeloveinitiative, via 5000letters)

Aug 11